April 21, 2019
Business

Chicago P.D. Star Amy Morton To Stage All-Female Glengarry Glen Ross On Broadway

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An all-female cast will hit Broadway in David Mamets Pulitzer Prize-winning play Glengarry Glen Ross next year under the direction of Chicago P.D. actress Amy Morton.

The new production will begin performances in May 2019, with cast, design team, a venue and exact dates to be announced. The producing team is headed by Jeffrey Richards, Will Trice, Rebecca Gold and Steve Traxler.

Morton, Tony-nominated as an actress for her Broadway performances in August: Osage County and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, will make her Broadway directing debut with Glengarry. An ensemble member of Chicagos Steppenwolf Theatre Company, she directed Guards at the Taj for Off-Broadways Atlantic Theater Company in 2015, and has a lengthy roster of directing credits for Steppenwolf including a 2001 production of Glengarry that featured a traditional male cast.

Mortons acting credits, in addition to Chicago P.D., include Boss, Chicago Fire, Blue Bloods, Girls and Homeland. She appeared in such films as Up in the Air, 8MM and Falling Down.

Mamets play, which won the Tony Award as well as the Pulitzer, chronicles the attempts of four Chicago real estate agents to unload some lousy property by any shady means possible. Glengarry premiered at Londons National Theatre in 1983, and on Broadway in 1984. The New York production starred Joe Mantegna, Mike Nussbaum, Robert Prosky, Lane Smith, James Tolkan, Jack Wallace and J. T. Walsh.

The 1992 film version starred Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, Kevin Spacey and Jonathan Pryce.

And while Glengarry might be most remembered today for Baldwins blistering, foul-mouthed “brass balls” monologue – a scene parodied by Baldwin himself in a memorable Saturday Night Live elf sketch thats become a staple of the comedys annual Christmas specials – the speech probably wont make its way into Mortons staging: Mamet wrote the monologue for the film. Some subsequent theater productions have included variations of it, though, so who knows? Always be hoping.

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