December 16, 2019
Politics

Ken Starr: Impeachment Inquiry Is a Coup Detat by House Democrats, Not Like Watergate

Former independent counsel Ken Starr, who led the prosecution during former President Bill Clintons impeachment in the 1990s, blasted the House Democrats inquiry into President Donald Trump, describing it as a “coup detat.”

He added that the current inquiry is “far removed” from the Watergate scandal that ensnared former President Richard Nixon, ultimately leading to his resignation.

Starr told Fox News that the Democrats current investigation has revealed no star witness in the vein of John Dean, the former White House counsel for President Richard Nixon. Dean testified against Nixon in the early 1970s.

“Heres John Dean testifying dramatically: Im in the Oval Office and I am participating in a criminal conspiracy with the president of the United States,'” said Starr, who headed the Whitewater probe into former President Clinton.

During the current inquiry into Trump, Democrats “have a witness who does not have a connection to the president … and knows of no crime. So its really night and day.”

In this June 10, 1983 frame grab of video made available by Raiford Communications, Inc., former president Richard Nixon talks about his 1974 resignation in a series of interviews conducted by former White House aide Frank Gannon in New York City. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and the privately held Nixon Foundation are co-releasing a trove of videotaped interviews with the former president to mark the 40th anniversary of his resignation following the Watergate scandal. The 28 minutes of tape, detailing Nixon's personal turmoil in his final week in office, were culled from more than 30 hours of tape recorded in 1983. (AP Photo/Copyright Raiford Communications)
In this June 10, 1983 frame grab of video made available by Raiford Communications, Inc., former president Richard Nixon talks about his 1974 resignation in a series of interviews conducted by former White House aide Frank Gannon in New York City. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and the privately held Nixon Foundation are co-releasing a trove of videotaped interviews with the former president to mark the 40th anniversary of his resignation following the Watergate scandal. The 28 minutes of tape, detailing Nixon's personal turmoil in his final week in office, were culled from more than 30 hours of tape recorded in 1983. (AP Photo/Copyright Raiford Communications)
Former President Richard Nixon talks about his 1974 resignation in a series of interviews conducted by former White House aide Frank Gannon in New York City on June 10, 1983. (Copyright Raiford Communications/AP Photo)

On Friday, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testified before the House Intelligence Committee during a televised hearing for about six hours. She told lawmakers that she didnt have any firsthand information regarding any alleged criminal activity or bribes.

Democrats have alleged Trump withheld military aid and engaged a pressure campaign to force Ukraine to investigate a political rival, forRead More – Source

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