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In the statement, the ministry said the advice had been issued "in connection with the threat of being detained or arrested at the request of US law enforcement and intelligence services in third countries." "Despite our calls to improve cooperation between the relevant US and Russian authorities… US special services have effectively continued 'a hunt' for Russians around the world," the statement said."Considering these circumstances, we strongly insist that Russian citizens carefully weigh up all the risks when planning trips abroad," it said.Moscow and Washington have been engaged in a protracted diplomatic tit-for-tat amid allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election. In late 2016, the Obama administration ordered the expulsion of 35 Russian diplomats from the United States.Russian President Vladimir Putin hit back last year at American sanctions by ordering the US to cut staff at its diplomatic mission by several hundred personnel.According to the statement issued Friday, more than 10 Russians have been detained in foreign countries at Washington's request since the beginning of 2017. The most high-profile Russian in American custody — convicted arms dealer Viktor Bout — was arrested in 2008 in Thailand and extradited to the US. "After extradition to the United States, Russian citizens face a prejudiced attitude on the part of American 'justice,'" the statement said, describing Bout as a "Russian businessman." The US has also issued its own travel warnings on Russia. On Jan. 10, a State Department travel advisory warned Americans to reconsider travel to Russia because of the threat of "terrorism and harassment."

Nathan Hodge reported from Moscow and Judith Vonberg wrote from London.

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Murdoch-Trump and the Disney-Fox deal

A U.K. regulator is recommending that the government block Rupert Murdoch's planned $16 billion takeover of Sky TV in its current form.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said in a statement Tuesday that the proposed deal by Murdoch's 21st Century Fox(FOX) is likely to be "against the public interest" because it would give the mogul too much control over British media.

"Media plurality goes to the heart of our democratic process. It is very important that no group or individual should have too much control of our news media or too much power to affect the political agenda," said Anne Lambert, chair of the regulator's investigations group.

The CMA's recommendation is provisional. Its final report will be submitted to U.K. Culture Secretary Matt Hancock by May 1. He will then have to decide whether to block Murdoch.

If he does, Disney(DIS) — which is buying most of 21st Century Fox — would end up owning Fox's existing 39% stake in Sky. Disney would then have to decide whether to make its own offer for the remaining 61%.

The CMA proposed steps 21st Century Fox could take to address its concerns, including spinning off Sky News.

The British government asked the regulator in September to examine the Sky takeover because of concerns that the deal would concentrate too much power in the hands of the Murdoch family.

Murdoch already owns three of Britain's biggest newspapers: The Sun, The Times and The Sunday Times.

Related: Disney is buying itself a messy TV deal in Europe

21st Century Fox said in a statement Tuesday that it was "disappointed" by the CMA's provisional findings and would continue to engage with the regulator.

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Personal:
Birth date:
March 11, 1931 Birth place: Melbourne, AustraliaBirth name: Keith Rupert MurdochFather: Keith Murdoch, journalist and newspaper publisher Mother: Elisabeth (Greene) Murdoch, philanthropistMarriages: Jerry Hall (March 4, 2016 – present);Wendi (Deng) Murdoch (1999-2013, divorced); Anna (Torv) Murdoch (1967-1999, divorced); Patricia (Booker) Murdoch (1956-1967, divorced) Children: with Wendi (Deng) Murdoch: Chloe, 2003; Grace, 2001; with Anna (Torv) Murdoch: James, 1972; Lachlan, 1971; Elisabeth, 1968; with Patricia (Booker) Murdoch: Prudence, 1958Education: Worcester College, Oxford University, 1953Other Facts:
Founder of News Corporation, Ltd., which has holdings in cable, film, television, internet, direct broadcast satellite television, sports, publishing and other fields.Murdoch has been compared to William Randolph Hearst, who is often considered the founder of tabloid-style journalism.Timeline:
1952 –
Murdoch's newspaper publisher father dies, leaving him control of the News Ltd. company in Adelaide, Australia. 1954 – Murdoch begins running News Ltd. 1956 – Purchases Perth's Sunday Times.1960 – Purchases Sydney newspapers the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror. 1964 – Starts The Australian, a national paper.1969 – Becomes a London publisher when he gains control of the paper News of the World. Also acquires The Sun, which he transforms into a tabloid. 1973 – Expands to the United States by purchasing the San Antonio Express and the San Antonio News.1974 – Moves to the United States.1974 – Starts the National Star weekly tabloid to compete with the National Enquirer. 1976 – Purchases the New York Post. 1977 – Purchases New York Magazine, Corp., which includes New York magazine and The Village Voice. Murdoch has since sold both The Village Voice and New York magazine.1979 – Forms News Corporation in Australia. 1981 – Purchases The Times of London.1982 – Purchases The Boston Herald.1983 – Purchases the Chicago Sun-Times. 1985 –Purchases Twentieth Century Fox from oilman Marvin Davis for $600 million. September 1985 – Becomes a naturalized citizen of the United States.1986 – Purchases several US television stations and creates Fox Broadcasting. 1987 – Purchases US publishing house Harper & Row for $300 million. 1988 – Sells the New York Post because of laws prohibiting ownership of newspapers and TV stations in the same market.1990 – Merges Harper and Row and two other publishing operations into HarperCollins.1993 – Purchases Star TV, a satellite television service based in Hong Kong.1993 – Buys back the New York Post. 1996 – Launches the Fox News Channel.1998-2004 – Owns the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. 2000 – Treated for prostate cancer. 2004 – Shifts News Corp. incorporation from Australia to the United States.2005 – Purchases Intermix Media, owner of MySpace.com, for $580 million. 2007 – Purchases Dow Jones, the publisher of The Wall Street Journal.March 2011 – Murdoch's son, James, is named News Corp.'s deputy chief operating officer and chairman and CEO of News International.July 2011 – Sells Myspace.com for $35 million. July 16, 2011 – Murdoch meets with the family of murdered teen Milly Dowler, and personally apologizes for the hacking of Dowler's phone by News of the World staff. July 19, 2011 – Murdoch and his son, James, testify before Parliament's Culture, Media and Sport Committee on the phone hacking scandal enveloping News Group Intl. During the testimony, a protester hits Murdoch with a pie made of shaving cream.February 29, 2012 – James Murdoch resigns as deputy COO, chairman and CEO of News InternationalMarch 2012 – The months long FBI investigation into allegations of bribery by officials of a Russian subsidiary of News Corp., News Outdoor Russia (NOR), comes to light. NOR, a billboard company, paid to advertise in public space on government owned property. News Corp sold its interest in NOR July 2011.April 5, 2012 – John Ryley, the head of Sky News, admits to authorizing journalists to hack into emails of private citizens. Sky News is owned by News Corp.April 24, 2012 – James Murdoch testifies before an independent British inquiry into journalistic ethics. He insists that he knew little about the scale of phone hacking by people working for the News of the World.April 26, 2012 – Murdoch testifies before the same committee. He admits to a cover-up of abuses at News of the World and apologizes for not paying more attention to the scandal. May 1, 2012 – British lawmakers investigating phone hacking at News of the World declare that Rupert Murdoch is not a "fit person to exercise the stewardship of a major international company." June 28, 2012 – News Corp. confirms that it plans to split into two publicly traded companies, one company for its television and film assets and the other for its newspaper and book publishing entities. Once the split is completed, Rupert Murdoch will serve as chairman of both companies and will also serve as CEO of the media and entertainment company. July 21, 2012 – A News International spokesman says that Rupert Murdoch has stepped down from a number of company boards of directors, both in the UK and the US.October 13, 2012 – Murdoch tweets about "scumbag" celebrities. Many speculated he was referring to singer Charlotte Church and television presenter Jacqui Hames after they met with British Prime Minister David Cameron to discuss the potential reform of Britain's media laws. Murdoch tweets later that he wasn't referring to "particular people" and apologizes for his language.December 2012 – James Murdoch becomes deputy COO of the Fox Group.January 2015 – Following the Paris terror attacks, Murdoch is criticized for tweeting "Maybe most Moslems peaceful, but until they recognize and destroy their growing jihadist cancer they must be held responsible." Later he tries to clarify his comments by tweeting "Certainly did not mean all Muslims responsible for Paris attack. But Muslim community must debate and confront extremism."June 16, 2015 – It is announced that Murdoch's sons will take control of 21st Century Fox on July 1.January 11, 2016 – Announces his engagement to Jerry Hall, the former model who has four children with Mick Jagger.March 4, 2016 – Marries Jerry Hall at Spencer House in London. The celebratory wedding takes place at St. Bride's Church in London, the next day.July 21, 2016 –Takes over as chairman and acting CEO of Fox News Channel and Fox Business Network as Roger Ailes resigns amid allegations by Fox employees of sexual harassment. August 12, 2016 –Names Bill Shine and Jack Abernethy as co-presidents of Fox News to replace Ailes. The two will report to Murdoch. December 9, 2016 – Murdoch's 21st Century Fox strikes a deal to take full control of Sky, one of the world's leading pay TV providers, in an offer that values Sky at $23.3 billion. March 2017 – Forbes names Murdoch, with a net worth of $13.1 billion, No. 90 on its annual World's Billionaires list. He is tied with Heinz Hermann Thiele. June 29, 2017 – The British government rules that Murdoch's 21st Century Fox should not be allowed to purchase Sky without a further investigation. Fox says it will "continue to work constructively with the UK authorities." August 29, 2017 – 21st Century Fox says it's pulling Fox off the air in Britain after failing to attract an audience. September 12, 2017 – UK culture secretary Karen Bradley says she intends to order an extensive review of 21st Century Fox's $15 billion planned takeover of Sky TV because of concerns over "genuine commitment to broadcasting standards" and the increased influence it would give the Murdoch family over British media.December 14, 2017 – The Walt Disney Company announces it is purchasing most of 21st Century Fox for $52.4 billion.

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Speaking ahead of Thursday's talks with British Prime Minister Theresa May, Macron insisted that France was doing all it could to prevent illegal crossings into the UK.Macron wants the UK to increase its spending to help ease the pressure on Calais, which was home to the former encampment known as the Jungle where thousands of migrants lived before it was destroyed by French authorities in October 2016."Calais has become an impasse," Macron said in a speech in the city on Tuesday."In no way will we let illegal routes to be developed here. In no way will we let a 'Jungle' spring up, or an illegal occupation of the territory."Macron and May are set to discuss the 2003 Le Touquet agreement, a deal that allows the UK to effectively have a border on French land and vice-versa. The agreement is unpopular in France. The move is in line with Macron's pre-election pledge to renegotiate the treaty. If the deal is scrapped, Britain's immigration services would have to deal with migrants when they arrive in the UK rather than before they leave France.According to the Elysee Palace, there are currently about 300 to 500 migrants living in Calais a — down from 2,000 14 months ago.Many are living in makeshift camps and attempting to find their way across the English Channel.The French government recorded 115,000 attempts to enter the UK from Calais in 2017 compared to 165,000 in the previous year.French President Emmanuel Macron during his visit to a migrant center in Croisilles, northern France.Macron met with a number of migrants at a center in Croisilles about 130 kilometers (80 miles) from Calais, before addressing security staff later in the afternoon.Macron wants to reduce the time it takes to process asylum claims from 18 months to six while offering protection to the most vulnerable, including women.He also pledged to challenge Britain on accepting unaccompanied minors, adding he would be seeking some "specific responses" from London on the matter.

Saskya Vandoorne in Paris contributed to this report.

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Europe

The announcement comes on the day French President Emmanuel Macron travels to the UK to meet with British Prime Minister Theresa May as part of a major summit on security and migration at the Sandhurst Military Academy.Macron has been outspoken in his desire to see Britain increase its spending in his pursuit of reshaping the 2003 Le Touquet agreement, a deal that allows the UK to effectively have a border on French land and vice-versa. The deal means the UK can screen passengers and cargo traveling to the UK while still in France, and allows for action to be taken against illegal migrants before they reach Britain.It also allows French officers to make checks on people traveling from the UK to France and farther into Europe.

'Secure as possible'

The additional financial package will be spent on security fencing, CCTV and detection technology in the French city of Calais as well as other ports along the English Channel."This is about investing in and enhancing the security of the UK border," a UK government spokesperson said."Just as we invest in our borders around the rest of the UK, it is only right that we constantly monitor whether there is more we can be doing at the UK border controls in France and Belgium to ensure they are as secure as possible."According to the UK government, it will aid previous security work that has already reduced the number of attempts to illegally enter the country through France.Figures provided by the Home Office reveal there were over 80,000 recorded attempts to enter the UK in 2015, which fell to 30,000 in 2017.

Macron pledge

The news is likely to be welcomed by Macron, who pledged to renegotiate the Le Touquet treaty as part of his successful election campaign.On Tuesday, Macron said he would challenge Britain on accepting unaccompanied minors, adding he would be seeking some "specific responses" from London on the matter.He also said France would not tolerate another camp being built in Calais, saying the port town will not be used as a "side door" for migrants to gain access to the UK.According to the Elysee Palace, there are 300 to 500 migrants living in Calais, down from 2,000 14 months ago.Many are living in makeshift camps and attempting to find their way across the English Channel.The French government recorded 115,000 attempts to enter the UK from Calais in 2017 compared to 165,000 the previous year.Macron wanted the UK to increase its spending to help ease the pressure on Calais, which was home to the former encampment, known as the Jungle, where thousands of migrants lived before it was destroyed by French authorities in October 2016.Macron also wants to reduce the time it takes to process asylum claims from 18 months to six, while offering protection to the most vulnerable, including women.

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The leaflets, which urge citizens to prepare for "crisis and catastrophes in peacetime, but also for different kinds of attacks on society and Sweden," is the latest step in the country's revamped defense strategy in response to perceived Russian aggression.The pamphlet is prompted partly by the "security situation in our neighborhood," meaning the Baltic area, a Civil Contingencies Agency spokesperson told CNN on Wednesday. The leaflets, which will be published later this year, aim to educate Swedes on how to prepare in case "their world gets turned upside down," and ask municipal regions to ready previous Cold War bunkers.According to a spokesperson for the Civil Contingencies Agency, the literature will also provide practical tips to ensure citizens have all the necessary food, water and blankets stocked at home.Sweden has been investing heavily in its defense strategy across the country, reintroducing conscription and also positioning troops on the strategically important island of Gotland. The country suspended conscription in 2010 and instead adopted a recruitment system which relied on volunteers.But it changed tack in March 2017, announcing conscription would return in 2018.The decision to boost defense spending by $720 million over five years was taken in February 2015 — but Sweden is lacking suitable numbers for its defense forces.According to government figures provided in March, the armed forces were 1,000 troops short in terms of full-time squad leaders, solders and sailors.The plan aims to ensure there are 6,000 full-time members serving with 10,000 available on a part-time basis.In May 2017 Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist told CNN: "The Russian regime has showed they are ready to use military powers to fulfill political goals."Sweden is not a member of NATO but it has contributed to NATO-led operations and enjoys bilateral ties with the alliance through the Partnership for Peace and the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council.

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Macron shed light Sunday on his "very direct relationship" with Trump, telling the BBC's "The Andrew Marr Show" that the two leaders talk "very regularly.""I'm always extremely direct and frank. He is. Sometimes I manage to convince him, and sometimes I fail," Macron said on the British talk show.Macron added that Trump was "not a classical politician" and was "elected by his humoring people."

Paris agreement: 'no renegotiation'

Macron, who was elected in May last year, said the two leaders had "built a very strong relationship." However they also disagreed on several topics, including the Paris agreement on climate change, from which Trump plans to withdraw unless the terms are renegotiated.Macron said the US could only choose between signing or not signing the treaty, adding "we will not renegotiate for one people.""I do believe that's a big mistake, I told him but there is no new negotiation. You join or you don't join. China decided to, to remain in the loop," Macron said.The Paris agreement pushes signatories to reduce their carbon output and hold global warming below two degrees Celsius by the end of the century.While former President Barack Obama described it as "best chance we have to save the one planet that we've got," Trump has been far from as complimentary.As things stand, the US will be the only country in the world not signed on to the accord when it completes the lengthy withdrawal process in 2020.

'It's not a word you can use'

Macron also criticized Trump's alleged use of the word "shitholes" to describe certain countries while discussing immigration with lawmakers earlier this month. "It's not a word you can use," said Macron about Trump's reported comment, adding "we have to respect all the countries.""I think a lot of our issues in both the Middle East and in Africa is due to a lot of frustrations due to a lot of past humiliations," Macron said.When asked about his opinion on Trump's tweets, Macron replied that people shouldn't "overplay the situation," saying the tweets are a "mix between personal and political reaction."

Macron: Trump's interpreter in Europe?

Macron is one in a small club of leaders with less experience in office than Trump. The 40-year-old French President appears to have used that to his advantage, forging strong ties with the White House based on a mutual desire to change the status quo.Read more: Trump's first year — diplomacy finds friends and foes Trump has replaced old international allies with new onesSince their first eye-catching handshake in Brussels, there have been highs (an intimate dinner with wives on the second landing of the Eiffel Tower) and lows (Macron has openly aired his disagreements with Trump on Iran, climate change and the Middle East.)Through it all, Macron's aides say he views himself as Trump's interpreter in Europe, sifting through the brash pronouncements to find places of common interest. And as leaders in Berlin and London find themselves distracted by internal politics, including coalition negotiations and Brexit, Paris-Washington ties are enjoying renewed strength.

CNN's Kevin Liptak and Dan Merica contributed to this report

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Europe

Farage, the former leader of the UK Independence Party, said it would silence "once and for all" the voices of those who oppose Britain's departure from the EU and want it to be stopped."The Cleggs, the Blairs, the Adonises will never ever, ever give up," he said, referring to prominent "remain" campaigners such as former Prime Minister Tony Blair. "They wil go on whingeing and whining and moaning all the way through this process so maybe, just maybe, I'm reaching the point of just thinking that we should have a second referendum on EU membership," Farage told the UK's Channel 5.It was the first time since the referendum that Farage has suggested he might support a second vote. Previously he has insisted that the result of the 2016 referendum had to be respected."I think if we had a second referendum on EU membership, we'd kill (the issue) off for a generation. The percentage that would vote to leave next time would be very much bigger than it was last time round and we may just finish the whole thing off and Blair can disappear off into total obscurity," he added. The UK voted to leave the European Union by a 52%-48% margin in 2016. The issue has dominated British politics ever since.Since the vote, some prominent opponents of Brexit have suggested it should be reversed. Blair, the former leader of the Labour Party, has argued that the electorate were not given a full picture of the consequences of "leaving the largest free trade bloc in the world." He has argued for voters to be given the opportunity to reconsider once the full details have been determined. "The people voted without knowledge of the true terms of Brexit. As these terms become clear, it is their right to change their mind. Our mission is to persuade them to do so," Blair said at a pro-EU Open Britain event last February. British Prime Minister Theresa May insisted on Thursday that there would be no second EU referendum. The government "remains very clear: there will not be another EU referendum," a spokesperson for May told CNN.

CNN's Nada Bashir contributed to this report in London.

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A historically poor showing for Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) in September's vote has left the Chancellor scrambling to hammer out an agreement with the second largest party in parliament, the center-left Social Democrats SPD.Going into the final round of "exploratory talks" between the parties, Merkel appeared upbeat but admitted that there were still "major obstacles" to overcome."We have done a lot of preparatory work but there are still major obstacles to clear," she told reporters Thursday. "This will be a hard day. But I'm starting this day with a lot of energy because we know that people expect us to find solutions". The party's leaders are all too familiar with each other. The so-called "grand coalition" between the CDU and SPD has been in power for the last 12 years, and it has lost its luster with German voters. Despite winning the most votes in the September election, both the CDU and the SPD suffered a record loss of voters. A recent poll from public broadcaster ARD showed that 52% of respondents did not think another grand coalition was a good idea. A grand coalition would also leave the controversial Alternative for Germany as the lead opposition party in parliament. The AfD's virulently anti-immigration platform proved popular with voters. Founded in 2013, the AfD surged into third place in September's election, the first time in decades that a far-right, openly nationalist party had won seats in Germany's federal parliament. Immigration is a key issue in coalition talks. Conservative critics in the CDU have blamed their election losses on Merkel's 2015 decision to allow as many as a million refugees into the country, and they are looking to put a cap on immigration and cut back on refugee benefits. The SPD, on the other hand, is strongly opposed to restricting immigration and benefits. Instead, party negotiators are hoping to score concessions on labor, health and education as well as greater integration with the European Union. The party's leader, Martin Schulz, envisions Germany as part of a "United States of Europe."Even if the CDU and SPD agree to move on to coalition talks, there will still be months of negotiations ahead as the two parties carve up ministerial portfolios. April or May is the earliest a new government could be in place. But if no deal is reached between the two parties on Thursday, Germans may have to go to the polls again — an uncertain outcome for a country that prides itself on its stability.

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Right about what about would happen if Britain held a second EU referendum. Right that a second vote on EU membership anytime soon would kill, possibly forever, any chance of rebuilding a meaningful relationship with the EU. Right that Remainers should be careful what they wish for.The passionate demand for a second vote echoes loudly on social media, which has rather too much influence on British political debate. Go to Twitter or Facebook and invoke the letters FBPE (Follow Back, Pro-EU) and you'll soon get the impression that simply everyone agrees Brexit is a disaster, that everyone now realizes that Leavers (poor, gullible fools) were tricked into voting Leave and will now welcome the chance to change their mind and keep us in.But step out of the bubble, and leave London (or its cultural suburbs in Brighton, Oxford, Bristol and Cambridge) and you'll discover that precious few Leavers have changed their minds. Brexit may well be a disaster in the making, but it's a disaster that millions of people have yet to see or experience. Indeed, the most remarkable thing about public opinion on Brexit is not how many people have changed their minds since the referendum, but how few: opinions remain remarkably stable and consistent in almost all polling.Of course, that could change in the event of a second referendum. Perhaps the Remain campaign would learn from its 2016 failures and do better this time, engaging with the cultural and social factors that drove the Leave vote instead of relying on a dry economic threat. But so far, there is no sign of the arch-Remainers doing so: Too many still believe that all that's needed is another lecture on the horror of Brexit and the Leavers (poor, simple-minded folk) will final realize how stupid they've been and recant. Or die: Perhaps the most horrible and counterproductive Remain trope is that Leavers are all elderly pensions who will pass away soon, leaving Britain with a pro-EU majority. Leaving aside how distasteful this is, and how statistically dubious, it's also very revealing: if you're relying on the Grim Reaper to help you, you're admitting you can't win the argument by force of persuasion.Or perhaps to win Britain back into the fold, the EU27 would suddenly make a big, generous concession on, say, freedom of movement? Again, there seems little sign of other EU nations wanting to reverse the British referendum. The Union has already started to move on to other priorities and debates. Ask yourself how far Emanuel Macron would go do bring Britain back into the EU? And how would the UK's liberalising Anglo-Saxon presence at the Council table help him advance his plans for a "Europe that protects"? So absent a better Remain campaign and a better EU offer, what else would UK voters be presented with at the second referendum? An angry, motivated and battle-hardened Leave machine driven by the narrative of betrayal and outrage. Theresa May strengthens party apparatus in Cabinet shakeup"You voted already. You know what you voted for — but these people just won't listen to you. You need to shout louder," Farage could say in that campaign. "What part of 'Leave the EU' didn't they understand? Use your vote this time to make sure these sneering, London elites finally get the message."And he would, I suspect, find himself on the same side of the referendum as not just the Conservative Party leadership, but Jeremy Corbyn's opposition Labour team too.My guess is that such a campaign would not just win but win by a wider margin than in 2016. And my fear is that in winning after a campaign charged with even greater anger and vitriol than in 2016, Britain would be left with an even more divided and dysfunctional politics than it has today.Instead of pursuing the risky dream of a second referendum, a better use of Remainer energy is the Single Market. There is very likely a majority in Parliament for a Brexit that keeps Britain in the Single Market, and very likely a majority in the country for it too. Remainers can still bring this about, but instead of trying to reverse the 2016 referendum, they need to find allies on the other side: the Leavers who would back the Single Market, who believe that "Norway" or EFTA membership or some similar deal can both honor the demand to leave the EU and avoid huge economic harm to the UK.So Remainers should pay close attention to Mr. Farage today. He's right, sadly.

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